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TFTB34 & PhD Course - Biosensor Technology

Background

Biosensors are analytical devices incorporating a biological material (e.g. tissue, microorganisms, organelles, cell receptors, enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, natural products etc.), a biologically derived material (e.g. recombinant antibodies, engineered proteins, aptamers etc) or a biomimic (e.g. synthetic receptors, biomimetic catalysts, combinatorial ligands, imprinted polymers etc) intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem, which may be optical, electrochemical, thermometric, piezoelectric, magnetic or micromechanical. Biosensors usually yield a digital electronic signal which is proportional to the concentration of a specific analyte or group of analytes. While the signal may in principle be continuous, devices can be configured to yield single measurements to meet specific market requirements. Examples of Biosensors include immunosensors, enzyme-based biosensors, organism- and whole cell-based biosensors. They are applied to a wide variety of analytical problems including uses in medicine, biomedical research, drug discovery, the environment, food, process industries, security and defence. The design and study of molecular and supramolecular structures with molecular biorecognition and biomimetic properties for use in analytical devices is also included within this theme.

 
This course focuses on the complementary intersection between molecular recognition, nanotechnology, molecular imprinting and supramolecular chemistry to improve the analytical performance and robustness of this commercially important class of analytical device. The field of Biosensors spans fundamental materials research, the design, fabrication and characterisation of systems, and their application in support of human wellbeing and environmental sustainability.


Responsible for this page: Martin Wing Cheung Mak
Last updated: 11/11/16