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Results - Main findings

  • The African wild dogs displayed a significantly higher total number of interactions across the 20 days of observations compared to the dholes. Except for the horse blood, the African wild dogs displayed a significantly higher number of interactions with the logs for all odor stimuli, compared to the dholes.
  • Both of the two species displayed the highest number of interactions when presented with the blood component. The blood component was significantly more interesting, in terms of number of interactions, than the fruity odor and the solvent for both species. The odorless solvent was the stimulus that both species showed the least interest in.
  • There was no significant difference in the number of interactions between the blood component and the horse blood for the dholes. The African wild dogs, however, displayed a significantly higher number of interactions with the blood component compared to the horse blood.
  • The average time spent per interaction did not differ between the two species. The only difference in duration between the four odor stimuli was displayed by the African wild dogs that spent a significantly longer time interacting with logs odorized with the blood component and the horse blood compared to logs odorized with the fruity odor. 


Responsible for this page: Agneta Johansson
Last updated: 06/09/14